Political Parties

Students, Wisconsin Working Families Party win big in Milwaukee; statewide education elections

Working Families - 7 hours 32 min ago

Wisconsin Working Families Party’s Marina Dimitrijevic with Tony Baez on election night.

Wisconsin Working Families swept the Milwaukee Board of School Directors election, beating candidates promoted by corporate operators and creating a pro-public education majority. WIWFP worked for months to create and elect a slate of public school champions –particularly activist Tony Baez — who will advocate for more resources for the school system and fight off unaccountable voucher expansion. Working Families also supported Tony Evers in his successful run for a third term as the state’s superintendent of public instruction. Education guru Diane Ravitch blogged about the wins, writing,”RESISTANCE! It works, especially at the ballot box.”

A Milwaukee Journal Sentinel analysis piece credits Wisconsin WFP for the strategy behind the wins and our long game. “The goal is to nurture farm teams of candidates who can advocate for public schools and other issues, such as increases to the minimum wage, and who can eventually challenge Republicans for state and national office. But the short-term impact may be most immediate in Milwaukee and Racine, where in just over a year, the boards that oversee the districts that collectively educate almost 100,000 students have shifted to include a majority of members aligned with the perspective of Working Families.”

 

The post Students, Wisconsin Working Families Party win big in Milwaukee; statewide education elections appeared first on Working Families.

Categories: Political Parties

WFP Endorses Chokwe Antar Lumumba for Mayor of Jackson

Working Families - Thu, 04/27/2017 - 18:35

The Working Families Party is proud to endorse Chokwe Antar Lumumba in the race for Mayor of Jackson, Mississippi!

Read the report in the Jackson Free Press:

WFP National Director Dan Cantor said: “Our nation will only change from the grassroots up. That change can begin in Jackson. Chokwe Antar Lumumba is an inspiring candidate running an inspiring campaign built on the belief that a city must truly serve all its people. We’re already hard at work to help him win so that the city of Jackson can realize that vision.”

“The Working Families Party fights for justice and opportunities for every community, and I’m proud to have earned their support,” Lumumba said.

Working Families Party organizers are on the ground recruiting volunteer and paid canvassers to knock on thousands of doors to get out the vote for Lumumba on May 2nd. Learn more about his campaign here.

 

The post WFP Endorses Chokwe Antar Lumumba for Mayor of Jackson appeared first on Working Families.

Categories: Political Parties

May 9: Open the Borders: A Socialist Case for Full Equality

Seattle ISO - Thu, 04/27/2017 - 16:27

Tuesday, May 9
7:00 p.m.
Common Good Cafe
(Downstairs at the University Temple United Methodist Church)
1415 NE 43rd St.
Seattle, WA 98105

RSVP on Facebook

This year has seen heightened attacks on immigrants and refugees in the U.S. While Trump spouts racist nonsense, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has been engaging in terrifying raids and speeding up deportations of immigrants across the country. At the same time, refugees are being abandoned and families attempting to escape imperialist wars are being portrayed as terrorists and criminals.

Marxists organize around very basic principles: everyone should have equal rights regardless of where they were born, and human beings should have the same rights as businesses to move freely. Join us for a discussion about why the socialist movement should both stand for open borders and work to build international working class solidarity.

This event is part of Red May Seattle, a month of events challenging capitalism and building towards alternatives. View the full schedule of Red May events at https://www.redmayseattle.org/schedule.

Categories: Political Parties

May 2: Understanding the Right Wing Today

Seattle ISO - Thu, 04/27/2017 - 15:55

Tuesday, May 2
7:00 p.m.
Common Good Cafe
(Downstairs at the University Temple United Methodist Church)
1415 NE 43rd St.
Seattle, WA 98105

U.S. and international politics today are highly polarized, and while there have been massive protests and widespread resistance to Trump’s agenda, the right has also grown in numbers and confidence. Some of these individuals and groups package their brand of racism and reaction in a populist veneer, others maintain an open allegiance to big business.  Join us for a discussion about right wing populism and the various forces that make up the right today. The second half of the meeting will be used for breakouts to organize various aspects of our local work.

Recommended reading:

Categories: Political Parties

Joshua Hall Becomes First CTWFP Candidate to Win State House Election

Working Families - Tue, 04/25/2017 - 21:08

Working Families Party candidate Joshua Hall has been elected to a State House seat, marking the second time a WFP-only candidate is elected to a state legislature in the CT. (Ed Gomes was the first in 2015)

Joshua Hall Becomes First Working Families Party Candidate to Win State House Election

Joshua Hall Wins in Historically Democratic Stronghold

Working Families: We can help you win and we can also help you lose

Hartford – With five polls and absentee votes reporting in the 7th State House District, Joshua Hall has won the election with approximately 625 votes. The endorsed Democrat Rickey Pinckney received 512 votes and petitioning candidate Kenneth Green, a former Democratic State Representative, received 367 votes.

Joshua Hall, Vice President of Hartford Federation of Teachers:

“I’d like to thank all the candidates for running a competitive race focused on issues that Hartford voters really care about. And I especially want to thank voters and our union brothers and sisters for the outpouring of support they’ve given me throughout this race.”

“The 7th district made it clear tonight that they’re not satisfied with the direction that our economy and state are moving towards. They’re concerned about the quality of education in our schools, having good jobs and vibrant neighborhoods, and making sure that we have a just budget that strengthens their ability to earn a good living and care for their families. That starts with eliminating backdoor tax increases on working families and setting budget policy that generates revenue without harmful cuts.”

“I look forward to working with Democratic and Republican legislators, and representing my constituents as we work to fix our budget in a way that is fair for hard working taxpayers.”

Hall’s victory marks the first time that an independent Working Families Party (WFP) candidate wins a State House election, and the second time a WFP candidate wins a legislative seat in Connecticut. Ed Gomes was the first WFP candidate to win a State Senate seat in a 2015 special election. Prior to 2015, the last time an independent party candidate won a legislative seat was in 1938.

Lindsay Farrell, Executive Director of the CT Working Families Party:

“The Working Families Party congratulates Joshua Hall on a hard fought victory, and thanks him for his hard work on the campaign and deep commitment to the residents of the 7th district.”

“Joshua ran a campaign that all North End voters can be proud of and the results show it. He’s a lifelong 7th district resident. It’s communities like his where the harm created by bad budget policies is usually felt first and deepest. Joshua has been fighting for the 7th his whole life. Voters know that and they know that he stands for working families. As a public school teacher, he’s seen first hand how education cuts have hurt students and families in his district. His connection to the community, record of hard work and strong progressive vision is what motivated voters to come out and vote for him on a rainy day. He’ll bring fresh, new leadership to the 7th and will be a great State Representative.”

“Joshua Hall’s victory comes at a time when more strong, progressive leaders are sorely needed in Hartford and in our state. The city is in fiscal crisis and without state help, Hartford residents will be hurt by deep cuts, the effects of which will resonate across the region. The health of Hartford’s economy affects our entire state, making it critical that legislators step up and find progressive economic solutions that help families thrive and bolster our economy. Joshua gets this and so did voters today.”

“With budget negotiations underway, his election could not come any sooner. His voice at the Capitol will be a welcomed addition to the growing list of legislators fighting hard for fair and sustainable budget solutions that generate revenue for our state and creates jobs. He’s not afraid to go against the grain at the Capitol. He’s a fighter.”

“Joshua’s victory today is further proof of the growing appetite among voters for progressive reform, budget justice and fair taxation. Despite all the doom and gloom, voters in the 7th have demonstrated their support for tax reform and a fair budget proposal that doesn’t shift the state’s economic burden onto lower and middle income families struggling to stay afloat.”

“In a city with arguably the strongest party machine in the state, tonight’s results show that the WFP can help you win and we can also help you lose.”

###


The Connecticut Working Families Party is a grassroots political organization that fights for economic and racial justice. The WFP is training and electing the next generation of progressive leaders to office, and fighting for and winning public policies that make a difference in the lives of working people, from raising the minimum wage to increasing funding for public education, to combating climate change, to reforming policing practices and diminishing the influence of big money in politics.

The post Joshua Hall Becomes First CTWFP Candidate to Win State House Election appeared first on Working Families.

Categories: Political Parties

Washington Socialist Weekly Update for April 21-28 (and beyond)

DC DSA - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 08:28
WEEKLY UPDATE
 
For April 21-28 (and beyond)

  The Washington Socialist Weekly Update aims to keep you and your fellow activists informed and your calendars as well-managed as possible (some of that is up to you) and fill in the gaps between the monthly appearances of Metro DC DSA’s newsletter, The Washington Socialist
We’re embarking on a very full ten days, with protests, actions and parades combining in the unmistakable form of resistance and demands for the alternatives we know will bring everyone a better life. Here’s the essential road map, below. But first, some members outline what has been happening.
 
>>DC Reinvest Coalition Aims to Redirect the City’s Investments to Its Own Communities
The Washington Socialist Weekly Update (4/21/2017)
By Alex Banks
The city of Washington, DC invests $2 billion in Wells Fargo, which supports dirty pipelines (like Dakota Access), private prisons, and racist, predatory lending practices. The solution: push the city toward full divestment. Tuesday evening at the Southwest Library, the newly formed coalition known as DC ReInvest gathered for a public mass meeting. DC DSA was well accounted for with seven of our comrades present along with representatives from most of the other six founding organizations: 350 DC, Rising Hearts, SURJ DC, Socialist Alternative and DC Fights Back. Led by SA's Sarko Sarkodie, the meeting welcomed newcomers to the campaign, which in the short term aims to have DC (as well as individuals) cut ties with Wells Fargo while seeing the District reinvest back into its communities over the long haul. 
 So far the campaign has had some typical highs: getting 6 out of 13 of the DC Council to endorse our proposal of divestment; and lows: being stonewalled by Council Financial Committee chair Jack Evans (Ward 2) thus putting a hold on the proposal moving forward. The meeting ran for about an hour and a half with plenty of audience participation. I invite members to join this effort and am happy to try to answer any further questions.
 Overall, it was a very inviting and informative affair with plenty of valuable knowledge offered. If anybody is interested in any upcoming events, check out the DCReInvest Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/DCReInvest/?ref=br_rs as well as their Twitter page: https://twitter.com/DCReInvest
>>People’s Budget Aims for Spending Alternatives -- Austin Kendall of the Economic Justice Committee attended this week’s meeting of the People’s Budget Forum, a coalition project that is developing an emerging alternative budget for the District, unlike the one proposed by Mayor Bowser that is distinguished by its tax giveaways to the wealthy and poor public provision for issues like housing and jobs – dire needs of communities like the slumlord-run Barry Farms, where the meeting took place. Read Kendall’s complete report.
>> Airport workers win living wage after 2-year campaign Sam Nelson reported Wednesday afternoon to the Economic Justice Committee (and our readers) in an “Update on the Fight for 15 front: Dulles and National airport workers will see a pay bump of $4 in January, with wages eventually getting to $12.75. This is a huge first step on the road to 15, thanks to all who came out to the various rallies and such…” Here is the account from Union City Thursday morning:
“Local airport workers won a huge victory yesterday when their two-year campaign for a living wage finally paid off. The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority approved a new policy ensuring that airport contractors pay their employees a living wage. The airport workers -- including wheelchair and checkpoint agents, terminal cleaners, cabin cleaners, sky caps and baggage handlers, many of whom now earn as little as minimum wage -- could see hourly wages increase to $12.75. "I never thought I'd live to see the day," said DCA airport worker David Tucker, who's worked at the airport for fifty years. "This raise will be great," said UNITE HERE Local 23 member Divina Stinchcomb, an airline catering employee of LSG Sky Chefs at Reagan National Airport. "For me, and I know for my coworkers, this will change my life." While SEIU 32BJ Vice President Jaime Contreras called the move “a step in the right direction," he said that workers still need $15 an hour and a union "to reach the light at the end of a long tunnel of poverty. These men and women," Contreras added, "continue to face intimidation and retaliation by employers and need the protection that only a union can provide."
 
ACTIVIST CALENDAR FOR APRIL 21-MAY 2
 
Saturday April 22
►Buzzard Point Community Cleanup with Empower DC  9 a.m. – noon. 100-106 N St. NW, DC 20024 Work with community organization members to clean, plant, paint etc. Info  MDCDSA Climate Change and Environmental Justice committee.
 ►MDCDSA Economic Justice Committee meets Saturday 12:30 p.m. to 2 at Petworth Library. 
The living wage for airline contractor employees at National and Dulles Airports was raised yesterday, we'll hear from a UNITE HERE local 23 rank and file organizer involved in the struggle on what's next. Aaron will talk about a healthcare town hall and project for universal coverage. We'll also be talking People’s Climate March and May Day and how we can build momentum from what promises to be a part of the revolutionary event.
 ►Climate Change and Environmental Justice committee flyering for our April 28 panel “Building the Green Economy” before the March for Science Sat, April 22 -- meet 2 p.m. at 89 Constitution Ave. NW
 
Sunday, April 23
►Picnic to Fund #PaidLeave4DC hosted by Jews United for Justice, Sunday 2-4 p.m. at Malcolm X Park, 2400 15th St NW. Universal Paid Leave Act was passed in December but startup funding was not allocated in Mayor Bowser's recent budget. Join Economic Justice Committee members as they speak with community organizations to coordinate next steps.
Socialist Feminism Reading Group Sun Apr 23 4 p.m. RSVP held at the Kogod Courtyard at the National Portrait Gallery in Chinatown, 8th and F Streets, NW (map) Join us as we explore and discuss topics within Socialist Feminism! Current selections are from Women: Class and the Feminist Imagination Learn more
►Progressive Maryland will be joining more than 30 other grassroots organizations from around the country in Washington, DC starting Sunday, April 23 (through Tuesday 4/25) for the founding convention of our new national organization, People's Action. At the convention we will: Build a Long-Term Agenda that points the way to transformative change and guides our campaigns now;  Commit to stopping the attacks on people of color, immigrants, women, Muslims and LGBTQ people;  Gather with friends and allies to celebrate what we have won and the movement we are building together. Information here.
►Our Revolution Maryland's first statewide meeting.  Sunday, April 23 3:30 p.m. Tommy Douglas Conference Center 10000 New Hampshire Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20903. A livestream with Nina Turner, Larry Cohen, Ben Jealous and DSA member Mike Connolly follows the meeting. Info and RSVP
►6 p.m. mass volunteer meeting for building the People’s Climate March, Friends’ Meeting House. Info
►Sunday evening (April 23) is article deadline for the May issue of the Washington Socialist monthly DCDSA newsletter. Send article submissions to Woody at woodlanham@gmail.com
 
 Monday, April 24
►Affordable Housing Crisis Meeting hosted by our allies at ONE DC, rally at 5 p.m. before the upcoming Zoning Commission decision for Brookland Manor. 441 4th St. NW (Judiciary Square metro) Info here.
►Direct Action Training and Opportunities  IWW (Industrial Workers of the World) has extended an invitation to Metro DC DSA to participate in their semi-regular direct action training this coming Monday, April 24 from 6-10 p.m. This training will cover various topics such as marshaling/security, de-escalation tactics, picketing, and how to speak to the media. After the training you will have an opportunity to sign up for a couple upcoming actions/events that IWW will be leading over May Day weekend, including helping to marshal at the May Day march that DSA's march will join up with at Malcolm X park. If you might be interested in more information on this training session and signing up, please contact Brian Dickey at grunt136@gmail.com.
 
Tuesday, April 25
►From CC&EJ committee: 100% Clean Energy Bill Launch w/ Jeff Merkley & Bernie Sanders  Tue, April 25, 11:45 a.m – 12:30 p.m. at Russell Senate Office Buildinginfo
►Panel: Community Lens: Public Transportation in the DMV 7-8:30 pm
A look at one of our region's most crucial resources; public transportation. This panel will explore how equity, worker rights, and our changing climate are connected. Panelists will offer community solutions for how we can have a robust public transportation system that is safe, reliable, affordable, and reduces the impact of climate change. Moderator: Sigute Meilus , Executive Director, Americans for Transit; Panelists: Zuri Tesheira: ATU Local 689; Ben Ross: Action Committee for Transit; Claudia Barragan:  Environmental Justice Committee, DC Sierra Club; David Schwartzman: DC Statehood Green Party <> MDCDSA is a co-sponsor.
St Stephen and the Incarnation Church, 1525 Newton St  NW  -- Columbia Heights Station, Green Line Metro, also S2, S4, 42, and 43 bus lines

Wednesday, April 26
Socialism vs Capitalism: A Debate Wed Apr 26 6:30 p.m. RSVP   ICC Auditorium-Georgetown University 37TH AND O ST., N.W., (map) Ryan Mosgrove, National Organizer for Young Democratic Socialists, and Charlie Kirk, Founder and Executive Director of Turning Point USA, will engage in a friendly debate on whether millennials should fight for socialism or capitalism. Both are college-based groups. This event will be livestreamed via Facebook Live! Stay tuned for the link! Further information

 Thursday, April 27
DSA Happy Hour Thu Apr 27 6:30 p.m. RSVP   held at Sudhouse 1340 U Street NW, Washington, DC (map)
Join us as we relax and enjoy some brews with our brothers and sisters of DC DSA. No agenda, no schedule, no topic, just some good conversation and beer. Learn more
 ​
Friday, April 28
It Takes Roots Action: Mother Earth's RED LINE -- Friday, Apr 28 “Direct action against the corporations and politicians driving the extractive economy” 2-4 p.m. submitted by our CC&EJ committee. Information and directions
BUILDING THE GREEN ECONOMY Friday April 28th 6:30pm: Doors open at Friends Meeting of Washington (2111 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008). Metro DC DSA is proud to host Building the Green Economy, a panel discussion on the intersections of economic and environmental justice. Is a meaningful reduction in carbon emissions possible under capitalism? What are the political obstacles to a fair, ecologically-sustainable society? Join us for an evening of invigorating discussion with environmentalists, activists, and academics. Panelists— Author Gar Alperovitz; UMD Anthropologist Shirley Fiske: NAACP’s Jacqui Patterson, PSL activist Eugene Puryear: psychologist Margaret Klein Salamon. Moderated by Metro DC DSA member and journalist Sam Knight. Panel at 7 at Friends Meeting and open house later at 1301 Conn. Ave NW, 6th Fl. (DSA office) at 9:15. $5 donation requested. RSVP

Saturday, April 29
People’s Climate Movement — March for Jobs, Justice, & the Climate Saturday, April 29 Information on DCDSA's participation is at the link. National DSA and DCDSA are both co-sponsors.

Sunday, April 30
►Sunday April 30 the MoCo Our Revolution group meets at the Gaithersburg Library 2-4 p.m., regular monthly meeting, info here.
Socialist Book Group meets Sunday, April 30 to discuss Matthew Desmond’s Evicted: Poverty and Property in the American City 3-5 p.m., Kogod Courtyard at National Portrait Gallery.

Monday, May 1
►DC DSA MARCH ON MAY DAY Monday, May 1st In observance of International Workers’ Day, Metro DC DSA is organizing a massive rally and march to show support and solidarity for workers around the world. Metro DC DSA is extremely proud to be working with Many Languages One Voice DC (MLOV), CASA, and the DC May Day Steering Committee to promote labor rights and other issues that directly affect the working class here in DC as well as around the world. The schedule:
12:00 p.m. -- Convene at Lamont Park (3258 Mt Pleasant St NW, Washington, DC) in the Mt. Pleasant neighborhood for a joint rally with MLOV and other local organizers.
1:00 p.m. -- March to Malcolm X Park (officially called Meridian Hill Park, 2400 15th St NW, Washington, DC) to unite with the DC May Day rally.
1:30 p.m. -- March to the White House (Lafayette Square, Pennsylvania Ave NW & 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC) for a massive demonstration led by CASA.
Closest Metro Station at Start: Columbia Heights (3030 14th Street NW Washington, DC 20009)
Closest Metro Station at Finish: McPherson Square (1400 I St NW, Washington, DC 20005)
To RSVP for DSA’s rally and march, visit http://bit.ly/2owpUiY
To RSVP for DC May Day rally and march, visit http://bit.ly/2p2tkdW
Help show that there is widespread support for radical change towards a sustainable economy run for and by workers! Here's an article from Cosecha via Portside on planning for some of May Day's actions

GOOD READS AND DIVERSIONS
►Among the week’s Good Reads – US readers might have had to turn to the Guardian for actual US peace community response to the “Mother of all Bombs” deployment.
►“How to Jam the Trump Brand” – members are sharing and touting this Naomi Klein video.
 ►With the end of the Maryland legislative session, attention is turning to the 2018 gubernatorial race. Progressive Maryland member Hal Ginsberg made a case for Ben Jealous in this op-ed in the Baltimore Sun
Categories: Political Parties

People’s Budget Forum brings the community together for powerful document

DC DSA - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 07:31
Washington Socialist Weekly Update
 
By Austin Kendall
 
Community organizations and activists gathered at Excel Academy in the Barry Farms neighborhood on April 13th to share knowledge on the DC Budget for fiscal year 2018.

The event was kicked off by Ianna from the Future Foundation, a community organizing group focused on issues of social and economic justice that meets at the Barry Farms Recreation Center.

Stephanie Sneed and Monica Kamen, co-directors of the Fair Budget Coalition, spoke on the necessity of fighting for a fair budget, and the fiscal specifics, respectively. Monica noted that only about 2% of the $13.8 billion budget goes to funding affordable housing initiatives and that more must be allocated to housing.

The attendees broke into groups based on policy interests, with facilitators specializing on Jobs and Worker Protections, Education and Child Care, Food and Nutrition, Housing, Veterans Affairs, Policing and Protection, and Healthcare and Medical Services[1] . The groups discussed their thoughts about the budget, and were brought together to create one document of the People’s Budget. This democratic socialist sat at the Jobs and Worker Protections table, led by Carol Joyner of DC Family Values at Work and Sequnely Gray of DC Jobs with Justice.

The discussion focused on Paid Family Leave, reforming TANF, and expanding transportation subsidies to adult learners. The “asks” were an additional $20 million to cover the full start up costs of administering the Universal Paid Leave Act; $2 million to extend the time that persons can use TANF, creating a hardship extension policy; and that subsidized transportation be extended to all publicly funded adult education programs.

There was a spirited discussion of how to propose that these additional items be funded -- ranging from a recommendation from a Jews United for Justice organizer to not spend an additional $40 million on new police cruisers, to standardizing the assumptions guiding the three reserve funds[2] , as they are now inconsistent and making them consistent would free up about $90 million, according to Kaish from DC for Democracy.
 
The break out groups reconvened and representatives from each group shared their discussion with the group. A representative from the DC Office of Budget and Planning responded to the Jobs and Worker Protections break out group that they are “working on eliminating TANF [time] limit.” They also said that there is movement towards making the Department of Human Services a “one stop shop” for benefits through coordination on providing services at one location, so that folks do not have to use their valuable time going to multiple agencies.

Monica Brokenborough, a Ward 8 teacher, spoke for the Education and Schools[3]  break out group, noting that Ward 7 and 8 schools are facing the most severe budget cuts because allotments are based on projected enrollments, which expect a shift to public charter schools. The community is invited to the school budgets hearing on Thursday, April 27th at 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the John Wilson Building.

Ward 8 councilmember Trayon White was in attendance, and the housing break out group turned to him to ask him whether he supports legislation to target slumlords. Councilmember White took the mic and said that yes, he did support such legislation, noting that there had to be more inspections and stronger fines to deter landlords from failing to maintain their properties. He noted the ongoing hearings regarding slumlord firm Sanford Capital as indicative of the DC attorney general’s office as making this issue a priority.
 
Another attendee stood to ask what could be done to prevent displacement of families that was sure to happen with the redevelopment of slumlord-run Barry Farms. White agreed with him that Barry Farms has been run by slumlords, but noted that the talks on redevelopment are still unfolding and it is too early to even comment on. White did remark that he was concerned that 30% of families are behind on their rent, a loophole that allows developers to prohibit families from returning to their homes.

The evening concluded with a charming play enactment by a group of young students on how to influence the budget.
 
The organizers of the People’s Budget Forum hope to get Forum attendees and members of the community to the council’s hearings on the budget, beginning with the first full council hearing on May 12th. Tactics are being debated, but all agree a large physical copy of the People’s Budget will be featured.

Kendall is co-chair of MDCDSA's Economic Justice Committee

Categories: Political Parties

NYWFP Leaders Announce Four Endorsements in NYC City Council Races

Working Families - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 17:18
The New York City Advisory Council of the Working Families Party has voted to endorse four candidates in the party’s first round of city council endorsements: Carlina Rivera (District 2), Marjorie Velazquez (District 13), Diana Ayala (District 8), and Alicka Ampry-Samuel (District 41). The four are all progressive women of color running for open seats in contested Council races this fall.

Read more in the New York Daily News:

The progressive party is backing Carlina Rivera for the seat in Manhattan currently held by Rose Mendez; Marjorie Velazquez for a seat in the Bronx currently held by James Vacca; Diana Ayala for the upper Manhattan and Bronx district represented by Council Speaker Melissa-Mark-Viverito and Alicka Ampry-Samuel for Darlene Mealy’s seat in Brooklyn. The members representing those districts now are term-limited and cannot run again.

“The Working Families Party is thrilled to support these four progressive leaders in their races for City Council,” Juan Antigua, the city political director for the WFP, said in a statement. “At a time when the Trump regime is directly targeting the rights and lives of New York’s working families — singling out communities of color, immigrants, and women in particular — these four women epitomize the values that New Yorkers hold dear.”

The labor-backed third party noted all of the pols they’re endorsing are “progressive women of color.”

There are only 13 women in the 51-member council — and there’s been concern the numbers could drop as term limits prohibit several of those women from running again.

 

The post NYWFP Leaders Announce Four Endorsements in NYC City Council Races appeared first on Working Families.

Categories: Political Parties

April 25: How Immigrants Revived May Day

Seattle ISO - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 20:22

Tuesday, April 25
7:00 p.m.
Common Good Cafe
(Downstairs at the University Temple United Methodist Church)
1415 NE 43rd St.
Seattle, WA 98105

In 2006, massive protests for immigrants’ rights swept the country. In every major city and many smaller towns, businesses shut down and marches filled the streets. Up until that time, May Day, which began as an international workers holiday in the U.S., had not been celebrated in any large way in the United States for many years. Since 2006, May Day has been a crucial day of protest each year, and this year will be see large mobilizations again. Join us for a discussion about the history of how immigrants revived May Day. We will also devote some of the meeting time to planning for the May Day actions in Seattle.

For background reading on May Day and the immigrants rights movement, consider reading:

RSVP on Facebook

Categories: Political Parties

Make May Day a day of resistance

Seattle ISO - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 20:19

From Socialist Worker:

Amad Ross writes from Seattle with a proposal for students to consider for May 1.

April 18, 2017

HERE IN Seattle, the favored topic of small talk has shifted from the clouds and rain to the president and his incompetence. Students at my high school have formed relationships with teachers on that basis alone, and it seems there is no longer any political division between instructor and student. This general agreement is important for its own sake, but especially for the potential it creates.

As high school students and teachers find common ground in their opposition to Donald Trump, the two will see new opportunities to stand up for one another politically. The first such opportunity is less than a month away.

Seattle teachers recently voted on whether to strike for the day on May Day, but failed to get the endorsement of the union, leaving an opening for high school students to carry on their struggle. On May Day, Seattle students should walk out of their schools and show support for their teachers’ efforts.

Last month, members of the Seattle Education Association (SEA) voted on whether to strike on May 1. The strike would have been a platform for teachers to demand better funding of public schools–an increasingly important issue in the age of Trump’s Education Secretary Betsy DeVos– and to voice support for the rights of immigrant and Muslim students. If a strike had been approved, the teachers would have joined a mass rally at Judkins Park beginning at 11 a.m. and culminating in a march at 1 p.m.

The union leadership did all that it could to prevent this vote from passing. They shortened the voting period and required that the decision be made a whole month in advance, voting on the proposal just nine days after it was made.

Despite this, 45 percent of SEA voters supported the strike. This means that roughly 1,500 educators voted “yes” to a strike–an extremely high number considering the difficult circumstances.

Worth noting, too, is that many SEA members work in elementary and middle schools, institutions more hesitant to enter the political arena. The proposal was far less controversial in many high schools, with many of the “yes” votes coming from schools with 60-90 percent of teachers in support. At my own high school, for example, I have failed to locate a single teacher that voted against the strike.

Here is where the students come in. As the subjects of these schools, we can give these teachers the strike they voted for by walking out on May 1 and going to the Judkins rally in their place.

This walkout would build new relationships between students and their teachers and show that we are all in this struggle together. These relationships are extremely important in the times we’re in. With Betsy DeVos as education secretary, the fate of our public schools hangs by a thread. As students, we need to organize to fight for our schools and their funding, just as our teachers have.

This action would also build solidarity among students. Seattle high schools have a large number of immigrant and Muslim students, individuals who are constantly under fire from Donald Trump’s rhetoric. A politically charged walkout would show these students that in the face of oppression, we all stand together.

For these reasons, high schools students across Seattle should organize and walk out on May 1. Through shared support of immigrant and Muslim rights, and militant defense of public school funding, teachers and students can work together to make May Day a day of resistance.

Categories: Political Parties

Weekly Update for April 14-20

DC DSA - Sat, 04/15/2017 - 09:28
WEEKLY UPDATE
 For April 14-21

Several Metro DC DSA committees meet this week as preparations for a marathon weekend of socialist resistance April 26-May 1 are afoot. We provide the latest on those events as well.
 
 
The Washington Socialist Weekly Update aims to keep your calendar as well-managed as possible (some of that is up to you) and fill in the gaps between the monthly appearances of Metro DC DSA’s newsletter, The Washington Socialist

THE UPCOMING WEEK:

Saturday April 15th tax day march at Capitol noon protest Trump’s undisclosed tax returns and the tax system that’s tilted to the benefit of those in power.  From 11:20 a.m. - 1 p.m.,DCDSA Sign Distribution and Outreach at the Tax March on the Supreme Court front steps -- do you think the Tax March's message of "Donald Trump should show his taxes" is a little too narrow-minded for our vision of a socialist future? Then come out and help flood the narrow message market with the true and just message of "Tax the Rich". We'll gather in front of the Supreme Court in order to split into teams and break off to distribute signs before joining the march, if anyone wants to do so.

Saturday April 15th DCDSA Communications committee 2-3:30, SE Branch Library.

Tuesday April 18th Book Talk at Economic Policy Institute, John Judis on his new book The Populist Explosion, 11 a.m.

Tuesday April 18th  DCDSA  Socialist Feminism Committee Meeting 6:30 PM C. B. Powell Building 525 Bryant Street NW , Washington , DC (map) RSVP  Prospective members can contact dc.socialistfeminists@gmail.com and request to be added to the Google group. Committee members are currently participating in the NNAF Bowl-a-thon on behalf of DC Abortion Fund. We have already raised over $1000! We are also planning a bowling/bocce games night. Here is the link to donate to our team: https://bowl.nnaf.org/team/114388

Tuesday April 18th 6:30 p.m.DCReInvest Mass Meeting: Divest from Wells Fargo! Southwest Library, 900 Wesley Pl SW
DC invests $2 billion in Wells Fargo, which supports dirty pipelines (like Dakota Access), private prisons, and racist, predatory lending practices. Join us as we discuss how to get involved and push the city toward full divestment.
Wednesday April 19th Jobs with Justice Pre-Mayday Information Session  La Casa • 3166 Mt. Pleasant St NW, Washington, DC 20010

Wednesday April 19th Our Socialist Book Group (see April 30, below) most recently read Jonathan Smucker’s Hegemony How-To and he talks about the book at Busboys at 5th and K, , 6-8 p.m.

FUTURES: MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW:

Saturday, April 22nd DCDSA Economic Justice Committee meeting 12:30 to 2 p.m., at Petworth Neighborhood Library, 4200 Kansas Ave NW, Washington DC 20011.
 
Sunday April 23rd DCDSA Socialist Feminist reading group meets; electronic copies of the readings are available- to join the group or access readings contact dc.socialistfeminists@gmail.com

UPDATE TO THE UPDATE; Sunday April 23rd 3:30-4:30 p.m. Our Revolution Maryland AKA Maryland Rising has a statewide meeting in Silver Spring at the ATU (Old Meany Center) conference building at 10,000 New Hampshire Ave. 20803 Info here.

GET READY FOR A BIG (LONG) WEEKEND APRIL 26-MAY 1 -- join the Metro D.C. Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) for a week protesting capitalism’s environmental degradation and celebrating workers and the resurgence of socialist ideas.

Wednesday April 26th: SOCIALISM VS. CAPITALISM: A DEBATE
YDS debates TPUSA at Georgetown University.

Thursday April 27th: DC DSA HAPPY HOUR
Come socialize with other socialists!

Friday April 28th: BUILDING THE GREEN ECONOMY 6:30pm: Doors open at Friends Meeting of Washington (2111 Florida Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008). Metro DC DSA is proud to host Building the Green Economy, a panel discussion on the intersections of economic and environmental justice. Is a meaningful reduction in carbon emissions possible under capitalism? What are the political obstacles to a fair, ecologically-sustainable society? Join us for an evening of invigorating discussion with environmentalists, activists, and academics. Panelists— Author Gar Alperovitz; UMD Anthropologist Shirley Fiske: NAACP’s Jacqui Patterson, PSL activist Eugene Puryear: psychologist Margaret Klein Salamon. Moderated by Metro DC DSA member and journalist Sam Knight. Panel at 7 at Friends Meeting and open house later at 1301 Conn. Ave NW, 6th Fl. (DSA office) at 9:15. $5 donation requested. RSVP

Saturday, April 29: People’s Climate Movement — March for Jobs, Justice, & the Climate Information on DCDSA's participation is at the link. National DSA and DCDSA are both co-sponsors.

Sunday, April 30 Socialist Book Group meets to discuss Matthew Desmond’s Evicted: Poverty and Property in the American City 3-5 p.m., Kogod Courtyard at National Portrait Gallery.

Monday, May 1st DC DSA MARCH ON MAY DAY
In observance of International Workers’ Day, Metro DC DSA is organizing a massive rally and march to show support and solidarity for workers around the world. Metro DC DSA is extremely proud to be working with Many Languages One Voice DC (MLOV), CASA, and the DC May Day Steering Committee to promote labor rights and other issues that directly affect the working class here in DC as well as around the world.

12:00 p.m. -- Convene at Lamont Park (3258 Mt Pleasant St NW, Washington, DC) in the Mt. Pleasant neighborhood for a joint rally with MLOV and other local organizers.
1:00 p.m. -- March to Malcolm X Park (officially called Meridian Hill Park, 2400 15th St NW, Washington, DC) to unite with the DC May Day rally.
1:30 p.m. -- March to the White House (Lafayette Square, Pennsylvania Ave NW & 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC) for a massive demonstration led by CASA.

Closest Metro Station at Start: Columbia Heights (3030 14th Street NW Washington, DC 20009)
Closest Metro Station at Finish: McPherson Square (1400 I St NW, Washington, DC 20005)

To RSVP for DSA’s rally and march, visit http://bit.ly/2owpUiY
To RSVP for DC May Day rally and march, visit http://bit.ly/2p2tkdW

Help show that there is widespread support for radical change towards a sustainable economy run for and by workers!
Here's an article from Cosecha via Portside on planning for some of May Day's actions

Saturday, May 13 Football, or as we sometimes call it soccer, with labor: DSA joins labor night at DC United.  

Categories: Political Parties

4/29 – Socialist Forum: Politics and Poetry with Amanda R.

SP-USA: California - Sat, 04/15/2017 - 00:27
Politics and poetry have always been aligned and this Freedom School will expand upon that point. This presentation will start with the Early Modern (also known as the Renaissance) English period (about 1485 to 1685 A.D.), move to the Age of Enlightenment (1685 to 1815 A.D.) with John Milton, stop at the 1916 Irish Rebellion with some William Butler Yeats poetry, and jump across the ocean to look at America during the Harlem Renaissance (1920 to 1929 A.D.) with Langston Hughes and his contemporaries, review second- and third-wave feminist poetry (1960s to now), watch some slam poetry performances, and finally stop at some modern poetry that was created by the Occupy Wall Street movement with Poet Laureate (1995-1997) Robert Hass as well as read poetry coming out of the Black Lives Matters movement. By looking at poems across poetic periods as well as the biography of some of the poets that will be discussed during this Freedom School, I want to reinforce the idea of art, in this case poetry, as a means of resistance. Poetry today continues to be an arena for social commentary and pushes for social change, and, above all else, a way for people to make their voices and opinions heard.

Presenter Amanda R. has a BA in English Education and is currently enrolled in an English MA program with an emphasis on Early Modern Literature. In addition to being part of the IESP and LASP chapters of the Socialist Party USA, she is the managing editor of The Socialist, the managing editor of The Poetics Project, and on the editorial board for Pomona Valley Review.

WHEN
Starts at 4 p.m.

WHERE
The Headquarters
320 N E St suite 100
San Bernardino, California 92401


Categories: Political Parties

4/15 Freedom School: Fighting Capitalism During the Trump Presidency

SP-USA: California - Fri, 04/14/2017 - 23:56

Join the Socialist Party Los Angeles Local for a group discussion on fighting capitalism in the age of Donald Trump. We’ll discuss the environment, strategies and tactics. Open to anyone who would like to attend.

WHEN
2-4 p.m.

WHERE
2617 Hauser Blvd.
Los Angeles CA 90016


Categories: Political Parties

Video: Phil Gasper on “Imperialism in the Age of Trump”

Seattle ISO - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 18:28

Video Credit: Mike McCormick

Categories: Political Parties

Earned Sick Leave Finally Passes MD General Assembly!

Working Families - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 11:27

This fight is still not over, but this is a major victory*

We made history this session! After five years of fighting for the 750,000 Marylanders unable to earn a single paid sick day, House Bill 1 – The Maryland Healthy Working Families Act is on its way to Governor Hogan’s desk. Our state has the opportunity to protect Marylanders who face impossible choices between their health and their family, all because they aren’t able to earn a single paid sick day.

Advocates and legislators united on Lawyers Mall to celebrate the historic vote. Our fearless co-sponsors Senator Mac Middleton (Charles County) and Delegate Luke Clippinger graciously thanked all the advocates for our tireless efforts to pass HB 1. “The burden of illness should not be compounded by the burden of poverty,” said Delegate Clippinger. After years of debate and compromise, said Clippinger, HB1 is “common sense” and “ready to be signed into law. We call upon the Governor to sign this bill.”

Senator Middleton proudly exclaimed, “we’ve come a long way, baby!” and stated that HB 1 is “probably the most important piece of legislation [the legislature has] done this year.”

 

 

In order to make the Healthy Working Families Act the law of the land, Governor Hogan must allow the bill to become law. If he doesn’t, we’ll have to wait until next January for a veto override vote to take place. That’s 10 more months Maryland families will have to wait before they will have the security of earned paid sick days guaranteed by law.

Please contact Governor Hogan today and urge him to sign HB1 when it hits his desk, and tell your friends to do the same! The more people who make their voices heard, the closer we’ll be to ensuring earned paid sick days for Maryland families.

Call Governor Hogan: 410-974-3901

Email the Governor’s office: http://governor.maryland.gov/mail/default.asp

Sign the petition urging Governor Hogan to sign HB1: http://www.earnedsickdaysmd.org/?page_id=1146

The post Earned Sick Leave Finally Passes MD General Assembly! appeared first on Working Families.

Categories: Political Parties

April 18: Seattle ISO Working Meeting

Seattle ISO - Tue, 04/11/2017 - 20:07

Tuesday, April 18
7:00 p.m.
Common Good Cafe
(Downstairs at the University Temple United Methodist Church)
1415 NE 43rd St.
Seattle, WA 98105

This week’s meeting will be a working meeting.  We’ll be discussing the April issue of Socialist Worker newspaper and also breaking out into working groups to organize various aspects of our local work.

Categories: Political Parties

The resistance will not be branded

Seattle ISO - Mon, 04/10/2017 - 22:39

From Socialist Worker:

April 10, 2017

On January 19, 2015, Seattle teacher and anti-racist activist Jesse Hagopian addressed a rally that preceded the city’s Martin Luther King Day march. Afterward, as he walked past a line of police who were blocking a street, officer Sandra Delafuente doused him with pepper spray at point-blank range–and then continued to spray several other people.

Video of the unprovoked attack was shared widely–and last week, an image from it went viral as part of a meme responding to the appalling campaign by Pepsi that tries to profit off the Black Lives Matter movement. In an article published at his I Am an Educator blog, Hagopian explains the story behind the image.

ON APRIL 5, I woke up to find out I was a meme gone viral.

The hilarious meme by @ignant_ was in reference to the shameful ad that Pepsi produced–and quickly took down–depicting model Kendall Jenner diffusing tensions between protesters and cops by handing one officer a refreshing can of Pepsi. When the officer cracks open the can, the protesters are overjoyed and the officer gives an approving grin. Peace on earth prevails because of commercialism and sugar water.

Hundreds of thousands of people have liked and shared the hilarious meme that mocks the ignorance of the Pepsi ad. The meme was made from an image taken of me at the 2015 Martin Luther King Day rally in Seattle.

But here’s what folks who shared the meme might not know about that photo: The image is a still taken from a video that shows me on the phone, walking on the sidewalk, when Seattle police officer Sandra Delafuente, totally unprovoked, opens up a can of pepper spray in my face. If only Kendall had been there with a cold can of Pepsi!

Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi ad

Many people asked if the photo was real or photo shopped. It’s real. Too real. I wasn’t on the phone with Kendall, but I was on the phone with my mom giving her directions to come pick me up because it was my 2-year-old son’s birthday party later that day. That’s when a searing pain shot through my ear, nostrils and eyes, and spread across my face.

My mom soon arrived and took me back to the house. I tried to be calm when I entered so as not to scare my children, but the sight of me with a rag over my swollen eyes upset the party. I spent much of the occasion at the bathtub, with my sister pouring milk on my eyes, ears, nose and face to quell the burning.

In the aftermath, I filed a federal lawsuit against the City of Seattle and the Seattle Police Department–which is under a federal consent decree by the Department of Justice because of its demonstrated excessive use of force–and I helped organize rallies and press conferences with other victims of police brutality. This pressure helped Seattle’s Office of Professional Accountability rule in my favor and recommend a one-day suspension without pay for officer Delafuente. Not much of a reprimand, but at least it was an acknowledgment of wrongdoing. However, Seattle’s chief of police, Kathleen O’Toole, directly intervened to erase that punishment. Maybe I should have tried handing her a can of Pepsi before I asked for justice?

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Jesse Hagopian after being pepper sprayed (Jesse Hagopian)

AFTER MORE than a year of stressful litigation, I reached a $100,000 settlement. This was in no way justice. Justice would have been making the officer who assaulted me account for her crime. But I was determined to make sure some good came out of the pain and I decided to use settlement money to start the Black Education Matters Student Activist Award to honor Seattle youth who pursue social justice and organize against institutional racism. Nominations for this year’s award are currently open.

I gave the first three awards out last year to some incredible young activists:

Ifrah Abshif, whose work founding the Transportation Justice Movement for Orca Cards secured travel funding for all low-income Seattle Public School students who live more than a mile from their schools;

Ahlaam Ibraahim founded the “Global Islamophobia Awareness Day” event at Seattle’s Pike Place Market;

Marci Owens has been a health care and Black Lives Matter activist and is a transgender student who has become a strong advocate for the LGBTQ community.

We need to support young change-makers like these because commercialism won’t save us. Corporations like Pepsi will always be in the business of trying to brand rebellion and profit from protest. But while they shamefully try to get their conglomerates “in the black” off of the image of the Black Lives Matter movement, we will be building that movement and fighting for a world where the wealth is used for the common good.

But for now, I’m just glad that one of the most painful moments of my life has been turned into stinging satire that makes me laugh out loud.

First published at I Am an Educator.

Categories: Political Parties

WFP Nominee for Hartford State Representative Joshua Hall Qualifies for CEP, April 25th Election

Working Families - Mon, 04/10/2017 - 09:49

 

— Hartford State Representative 7th District Special Election on April 25 — WFP Nominee Joshua Hall Campaign Qualifies for Citizen’s Election Program

Hartford – The Working Families Party candidate Joshua Hall has qualified for a partial grant under the Citizen’s Election Program (CEP), Connecticut’s clean campaign financing system.  The campaign reported raising $5,515 from 206 individual donors, an average of $26 per donor. 150 contributors reside in Hartford. The qualifying funds were raised in a less than three weeks, and far surpass the amount needed for public financing in this race. To qualify in a special election, a candidate for State Representative must raise a minimum of $3,850 in amounts ranging from $5 to $100 and a minimum of 114 contributors who reside in Hartford.

Since Josh is running on the Working Families Party line, he needs additionally to collect at least 600 verified petition signatures to qualify for a CEP grant. The campaign has met this requirement, signaling the appetite in the district for leadership who is active in the community.

Joshua Hall, Vice President of Hartford Federation of Teachers: “Voters in the 7th want someone they know is willing to roll up their sleeves and be active in the community. I’ve been in the district all my life, working shoulder to shoulder with students and parents, fighting for workers through my union, and speaking out against policies that would hurt Hartford. I’ve dedicated my whole career making life better for Hartford’s residents and plan to keep doing just that as the state representative.”

Lindsay Farrell, State Director of CT Working Families Party: “Joshua is running for all the right reasons. He gets it done and has the record to show it. Josh could have raised money without the support of the community – with PAC checks and large donations from folks with deep pockets. But Josh has always worked closely with the community and he’s never been shy about doing the hard work, and we are proud of him for doing so again to raise a clean election grant in this race.”

Joshua‘s fought hard for Hartford’s schools and communities  — and won. He has helped stop the state from closing down Hartford’s schools; started career-oriented job training programs to prepare and mentor local youth to find good paying jobs; increased teacher diversity in our school system; raised $2.5 mil for public schools; fought school privatization. And Joshua Hall, a 7th district native and Norfolk State University graduate, served Hartford as a public school teacher for 12 years at Weaver High.  He is current Vice President of the Hartford Federation of Teachers, and lives in Blue Hills with his wife, Timcia, and two sons.

The Working Families Party endorsement comes with strong grassroots field support, candidate training and strategic campaign support. All candidates are carefully vetted to ensure that they reflect the views and goals of Working Families’ members. Recent polling affirmed Working Families’ members vote for candidates who will fight hard for economic justice, tax fairness, fair wages and workers’ benefits. They also want affordable healthcare, strong public education system and immigration reform.

In a 2015 special election, Working Families Party supported Ed Gomes for state senate in the 23rd district after the Democratic Party failed to nominate a candidate reflective of the community’s values. Gomes won that election, becoming the first third-party legislator elected in almost a century in Connecticut.

In the last election, the Connecticut Working Families Party garnered its strongest showing to date having received – for the first time – over 5% of the vote on its line for U.S. Senate. Approximately 87,948 votes were cast for Richard Blumenthal under the Working Families Party ballot line.

The post WFP Nominee for Hartford State Representative Joshua Hall Qualifies for CEP, April 25th Election appeared first on Working Families.

Categories: Political Parties

U.S. missiles won’t liberate the Syrian people

International Socialist Organization - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 12:23

Anyone who cares about justice and peace needs to mobilize against the U.S. government's new escalation of the bloodshed and repression in the Middle East. Below is a special editorial (PDF) by Socialist Worker—the newspaper of the International Socialist Organization—condemning Trump’s cruise missile attack on Syria and calling for resistance to his escalation of the U.S. war in Syria.

April 8, 2017

The Trump administration's April 7 missile strike targeting the Shayrat Syrian Arab Air Force base in Syria is a frightening escalation of a six-year-old conflict that has already had catastrophic consequences for the Syrian people.

Trump said the decision to launch 59 Tomahawk Cruise missiles was in retaliation for the April 4 Sarin gas attack in Idlib province, carried out by the Bashar al-Assad regime, that killed scores of civilians and left hundreds sickened. "I will tell you that attack on children had a big impact on me," Trump said. "My attitude toward Syria and Assad has changed very much."

But this claimed concern about civilian casualties is nothing but rank hypocrisy coming from Trump.Read more

Categories: Political Parties

Weekly Update for April 8-14

DC DSA - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 07:40
 
WEEKLY UPDATE
 FOR APRIL 8, 2017
As socialists, we've been known to use the term "crisis" a lot, usually in connection with the crisis of capitalism. That's still a thing, but it's the crisis inside the crisis -- Donald Trump's regime -- that leads us to move beyond the monthly frequency of the Washington Socialist to add these weekly updates. We include both calendar items and timely articles, as you see.

This weekend (April 8-9) satisfyingly grubby action by the (Anacostia) riverside, and a town hall that examines capitalism's central role in oppressing vulnerable groups in "Connecting Race and the Socialist Resistance." Sunday, Metro DC DSA's monthly membership meeting, amping up for the struggle. Here are details:
 
Today, Saturday 4/8
 
9:00am - 11:00am
Potomac River Cleanup
DSA members will meet to dispose of trash alongside the Potomac River near the Washington Canoe Club in Georgetown before heading to the Racial Justice Town Hall (12:00pm)
Details: https://www.facebook.com/events/202975903524173/
Washington Canoe Club
3700 Water St NW, Washington, DC 20007
 
12:00pm - 5:00pm
Town Hall: Connecting Race & the Socialist Resistance
Join DSA for a range of speakers, workshops and more to highlight the connections between attacks on vulnerable communities and capitalism. It's going to be a big event for members and non-members alike, so please bring friends!
Details: https://www.facebook.com/events/1694834294142480/
Communications Workers of America
501 3rd St NW, Washington, DC
 
 
Sunday 4/9
 
3:30pm - 5:00pm
DC DSA April General Membership Meeting
Metro DC DSA will conduct its monthly general meeting, which will include a floor vote to set rules and conditions for the Steering Committee vote, scheduled for the next general meeting (now May 7). Please be sure your national DSA membership is current and be able to provide some verification of membership to vote! (If you are not found on the member list your membership card or an members email from DSA will serve, or else two documented members may vouch for you.)
Details: https://www.facebook.com/events/1829585347307035/
Friends Meeting of Washington
2111 Florida Ave NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20008


Activity update: Leo Gertner reports on the latest meeting of the Jobs with Justice Steering Committee, on which Metro DC DSA is represented. Organizations from many parts of the struggle converge on this committee for mutual information, support and decision-making. Read the complete article here.



Categories: Political Parties

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